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Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Duress In Immigration Law, Elizabeth A. Keyes 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Duress In Immigration Law, Elizabeth A. Keyes

Seattle University Law Review

The doctrine of duress is common to other bodies of law, but the application of the duress doctrine is both unclear and highly unstable in immigration law. Outside of immigration law, a person who commits a criminal act out of well-placed fear of terrible consequences is different than a person who willingly commits a crime, but American immigration law does not recognize this difference. The lack of clarity leads to certain absurd results and demands reimagining, redefinition, and an unequivocal statement of the significance of duress in ascertaining culpability. While there are inevitably some difficult lines to be drawn in ...


No, The Firing Squad Is Not Better Than Lethal Injection: A Response To Stephanie Moran’S A Modest Proposal, Michael Conklin 2021 Seattle University School of Law

No, The Firing Squad Is Not Better Than Lethal Injection: A Response To Stephanie Moran’S A Modest Proposal, Michael Conklin

Seattle University Law Review

In the article A Modest Proposal: The Federal Government Should Use Firing Squads to Execute Federal Death Row Inmates, Stephanie Moran argues that the firing squad is the only execution method that meets the requirements of the Eighth Amendment. In order to make her case, Moran unjustifiably overstates the negative aspects of lethal injection while understating the negative aspects of firing squads. The entire piece is predicated upon assumptions that are not only unsupported by the evidence but often directly refuted by the evidence. This Essay critically analyzes Moran’s claims regarding the alleged advantages of the firing squad over ...


The Virginia Company To Chick-Fil-A: Christian Business In America, 1600–2000, Joseph P. Slaughter 2021 Seattle University School of Law

The Virginia Company To Chick-Fil-A: Christian Business In America, 1600–2000, Joseph P. Slaughter

Seattle University Law Review

The Supreme Court’s 2014 decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. is one of its most controversial in recent history. Burwell’s narrow 5–4 ruling states that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 applies to closely held, for-profit corporations seeking religious exemptions to the Affordable Care Act. As a result, the Burwell decision thrust Hobby Lobby, the national craft chain established by the conservative evangelical Green family of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, onto the national stage. Firms like Hobby Lobby and Chick-fil-A, however, reject the conventional wisdom Justice Ginsburg explained in Burwell and instead embrace an approach ...


Religious Roots Of Corporate Organization, Amanda Porterfield 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Religious Roots Of Corporate Organization, Amanda Porterfield

Seattle University Law Review

Religion and corporate organization have developed side-by-side in Western culture, from antiquity to the present day. This Essay begins with the realignment of religion and secularity in seventeenth-century America, then looks to the religious antecedents of corporate organization in ancient Rome and medieval Europe, and then looks forward to the modern history of corporate organization. This Essay describes the long history behind the entanglement of business and religion in the United States today. It also shows how an understanding of both religion and business can be expanded by looking at the economic aspects of religion and the religious aspects of ...


The Spirit Is Willing: A Proposal For American Single Malt Whiskey, Raymond Cleaveland 2021 Seattle University School of Law

The Spirit Is Willing: A Proposal For American Single Malt Whiskey, Raymond Cleaveland

Seattle University Law Review

Over the past twenty-five years, small, independent American distilleries have carved out a new niche in the United States liquor market: craft single malt whiskey. Inspired by the success of single malt Scotch and other single malts, American craft distillers are now fighting for their own shelf behind the bar and in the liquor store aisle. In 2018, a cadre of these distillers petitioned the U.S. Treasury Department’s Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau to formally recognize a new category of whiskey in the Code of Federal Regulations: American Single Malt Whiskey. For purposes of consumer protection ...


Aman Relflects On "Page-Turning" Opportunities Throught His Indiana Law Tenure, Kenneth L. Turchi, Alfred Aman 2020 Indiana University School of Law

Aman Relflects On "Page-Turning" Opportunities Throught His Indiana Law Tenure, Kenneth L. Turchi, Alfred Aman

Alfred Aman Jr. (1991-2002)

After nearly 50 years of practicing, teaching, and administration, Alfred C. (Fred) Aman, Jr., took emeritus status at the end of the 2019–2020 academic year. Earlier this fall, he visited with ergo editor Ken Turchi to reflect on his distinguished career.


Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Enough Is As Good As A Feast, Noah C. Chauvin

Seattle University Law Review

Ipse Dixit, the podcast on legal scholarship, provides a valuable service to the legal community and particularly to the legal academy. The podcast’s hosts skillfully interview guests about their legal and law-related scholarship, helping those guests communicate their ideas clearly and concisely. In this review essay, I argue that Ipse Dixit has made a major contribution to legal scholarship by demonstrating in its interview episodes that law review articles are neither the only nor the best way of communicating scholarly ideas. This contribution should be considered “scholarship,” because one of the primary goals of scholarship is to communicate new ...


Justice Sonia Sotomayor: The Court’S Premier Defender Of The Fourth Amendment, David L. Hudson Jr. 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Justice Sonia Sotomayor: The Court’S Premier Defender Of The Fourth Amendment, David L. Hudson Jr.

Seattle University Law Review

This essay posits that Justice Sotomayor is the Court’s chief defender of the Fourth Amendment and the cherished values it protects. She has consistently defended Fourth Amendment freedoms—in majority, concurring, and especially in dissenting opinions. Part I recounts a few of her majority opinions in Fourth Amendment cases. Part II examines her concurring opinion in United States v. Jones. Part III examines several of her dissenting opinions in Fourth Amendment cases. A review of these opinions demonstrates what should be clear to any observer of the Supreme Court: Justice Sotomayor consistently defends Fourth Amendment principles and values.


Court-Packing In 2021: Pathways To Democratic Legitimacy, Richard Mailey 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Court-Packing In 2021: Pathways To Democratic Legitimacy, Richard Mailey

Seattle University Law Review

This Article asks whether the openness to court-packing expressed by a number of Democratic presidential candidates (e.g., Pete Buttigieg) is democratically defensible. More specifically, it asks whether it is possible to break the apparent link between demagogic populism and court-packing, and it examines three possible ways of doing this via Bruce Ackerman’s dualist theory of constitutional moments—a theory which offers the possibility of legitimating problematic pathways to constitutional change on democratic but non-populist grounds. In the end, the Article suggests that an Ackermanian perspective offers just one, extremely limited pathway to democratically legitimate court-packing in 2021: namely ...


Government Tweets, Government Speech: The First Amendment Implications Of Government Trolling, Douglas B. McKechnie 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Government Tweets, Government Speech: The First Amendment Implications Of Government Trolling, Douglas B. Mckechnie

Seattle University Law Review

President Trump has been accused of using @realDonaldTrump to troll his critics. While the President’s tweets are often attributed to his personal views, they raise important Constitutional questions. This article posits that @realDonaldTrump tweets are government speech and, where they troll government critics, they violate the Free Speech Clause. I begin the article with an exploration of President Trump’s use of @realDonaldTrump from his time as a private citizen to President. The article then chronicles the development of the government speech doctrine and the Supreme Court’s factors that differentiate private speech from government speech. I argue that ...


Tribute To Professor Samuel W. Calhoun, Doug Ammar, David Carson, Kelly Faglioni, John Fishwick, Mark Grunewald, Stephen Halpin, Brandon Hasbrouck, Brant Hellwig, Lyman Johnson, Bill Johnston, Rick Kirgis, Brian Murchison, Joan Shaughnessy, Howard Wall 2020 Georgia Justice Project

Tribute To Professor Samuel W. Calhoun, Doug Ammar, David Carson, Kelly Faglioni, John Fishwick, Mark Grunewald, Stephen Halpin, Brandon Hasbrouck, Brant Hellwig, Lyman Johnson, Bill Johnston, Rick Kirgis, Brian Murchison, Joan Shaughnessy, Howard Wall

Washington and Lee Law Review

A tribute to Professor Samuel W. Calhoun, who served on the faculty of the Washington and Lee University School of Law from 1978 to 2020. Calhoun became Professor of Law, Emeritus in 2020.


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Tribute To Professor Mary Z. Natkin, David Carson, Christine Greene, Mark Grunewald, Howard Highland, Brianne Kleinert, Brian C. Murchison, Debbie Price, Sheryl Salm, Joan Shaughnessy 2020 23rd Judicial Circuit of Virginia

Tribute To Professor Mary Z. Natkin, David Carson, Christine Greene, Mark Grunewald, Howard Highland, Brianne Kleinert, Brian C. Murchison, Debbie Price, Sheryl Salm, Joan Shaughnessy

Washington and Lee Law Review

A tribute to Professor Mary Z. Natkin, who served on the faculty of the Washington and Lee University School of Law from 1987 to 2020. Professor Natkin is also an alumna of W&L Law, having graduated with the Class of 1985.


Federal Sentencing: A Judge’S Personal Sentencing Journey Told Through The Voices Of Offenders He Sentenced, Mark W. Bennett 2020 Drake University Law School

Federal Sentencing: A Judge’S Personal Sentencing Journey Told Through The Voices Of Offenders He Sentenced, Mark W. Bennett

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

Federal sentencing is a tragic mess. Thirty years of conflicting legislative experiments began with high hopes but resulted in mass incarceration. Federal sentences, especially in drug cases, are all too often bone-crushingly severe.

In this Article, the Honorable Mark Bennett, a retired federal judge, shares about his journey with federal sentencing and his strong disagreement with the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines by telling the stories of some of the 400 men and women he sentenced during his twenty-five years as a federal judge.


Pillars Of Justice: Lawyers And The Liberal Tradition, By Owen Fiss, Saba Samanian 2020 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Pillars Of Justice: Lawyers And The Liberal Tradition, By Owen Fiss, Saba Samanian

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

AT TIMES, IT IS POSSIBLE TO UNDERESTIMATE, or perhaps momentarily forget, the individuals who have been instrumental in shaping the evolution of the justice system. Thankfully, Pillars of Justice by Owen Fiss serves as a reminder of the resilience and the triumph of such individuals. Each chapter of the book is dedicated to someone who he considers to have made a significant contribution to justice, and, as such, has become a personal hero.


The Passion Of John Paul Stevens, Linda Greenhouse 2020 Yale Law School

The Passion Of John Paul Stevens, Linda Greenhouse

Michigan Law Review

Review of John Paul Stevens' The Making of a Justice: Reflections on My First 94 Years.


Dean's Desk: Amid Covid-19 Shutdown, Iu Maurer Displays Resilience, Austen L. Parrish 2020 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Dean's Desk: Amid Covid-19 Shutdown, Iu Maurer Displays Resilience, Austen L. Parrish

Austen Parrish (2014-)

The spring semester is coming to a close in Bloomington, but in ways none of us expected. The COVID-19 pandemic required us to shift to teaching remotely in a matter of days, and all on-campus events — including commencement — have been canceled or postponed. Fortunately, when classes resumed remotely March 30, our students, faculty and staff more than rose to the occasion and pulled together, and the transition has been smoother than expected.

Our community’s resilience and positive attitude through the pandemic have led me to reflect more broadly on the wonderful support — financial and otherwise — we receive from alumni ...


That Further Shore: A Memoir Of Irish Roots And American Promise [Table Of Contents], John D. Feerick 2020 Fordham University

That Further Shore: A Memoir Of Irish Roots And American Promise [Table Of Contents], John D. Feerick

Biography

A rare and evocative memoir of a respected constitutional scholar, dedicated public servant, political reformer, and facilitator of peace in the land of his ancestors

John D. Feerick’s life has all the elements of a modern Horatio Alger story: the poor boy who achieves success by dint of his hard work. But Feerick brought other elements to that classical American success story: his deep religious faith, his integrity, and his paramount concern for social justice. In his memoir, The Further Shore, Feerick shares his inspiring story, from its humble beginnings born to immigrant parents in the South Bronx, going ...


"The Function Of The Independent Lawyer As A Guardian Of Our Freedom": The Great Stevens Dissent In Walters, Andrew Koppelman 2020 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

"The Function Of The Independent Lawyer As A Guardian Of Our Freedom": The Great Stevens Dissent In Walters, Andrew Koppelman

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


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